Last update: 02-06-15

 
 

CAE-Picture gallery 3

 
 

other CAE-Galleries

 

Overview Gallery 3

 

Antenna

Warning

Fort

SYmbol

RCE

Towers

SW-antenna
Info | Larger Image

Warning
Info | Larger Image

Fort Victoria
Info | Larger Image

Symbol
Info | Larger Image

RCE
Info | Larger Image

Towers
Info | Larger Image

CAE

Tape Recorder

Barclay

Louie

Wes

Mal

Stationbuilding 1970
Info | Larger Image

Tape recorder
Info | Larger Image

Barclay McMillan
Info | Larger Image

"Louie" Ruhs
Info | Larger Image

Wes Barnaby
Info | Larger Image

Mal Jones
Info | Larger Image

Richard

Symbol

Studio A

Studio A

Coffee Break

Check

Richard Cousson
Info | Larger Image

CAE-symbol
Info | Larger Image

Studio A
Info | Larger Image

Controllroom
Info | Larger Image

"Coffee Break"
Info | Larger Image

Check in
Info | Larger Image

Gate
      

Gate closed
Info | Larger Image

     


AntennaWith this aerial on top of the stationbuilding the shortwave-transmitter from Sackville, East-Canada was received, which brought the hourly news from the CBC. The receiver had the size of a phone-booth and was not very easy to handle. Announcer Rob Bull knows to report about a funny incident: he wanted to have lunch and had ordered one of the German technicians to record the news from shortwave and air them later at 1 P.M. over CAE. But there must have been some difficulties in the German-Canadian communication, because at 1 P.M. Radio CAE suddenly carried the news from Radio Moscow. The Army was not amused…  (sound)

Larger Image

 

warning"You're about to enter the most dangerous area in the world" – that was an urgent warning at that time for the soldiers leaving the Forts. topThe German roads, back then were by far not as overcrowded as today, but they were poor developed and for those "impetuous young men" out of the Canadian wilderness with their sometimes very sporty vehicles often unpredictable and not easy to assess. Unfortunately therefore exists a not insignificant sad statistic of heavy car-accidents from the days of Radio CAE, for which Canadians were to blame.

Larger Image

 

Fort Radio CAE was located with studios and transmitter at the highest point of Fort Victoria on a hill between Wickede and Werl. It was also called "Camp 8" and hosted the Royal Engineers. On the same side of the road a little down the hill laid Fort St. Louis ("Camp 6") where the Globe Cinema was located, and across to Ft. Victoria on the other side of the road was Fort Anne ("Camp 7"), both home of the Royale 22eme Regiment. The command of the Canadian brigade was in Fort Henry near Soest, where also Fort Chambly and Fort York were located. Near Hemer and Iserlohn there were Fort Beausejour, Fort Prince of Wales, and Fort McLeod (P.P.C.L.I. Regiment).

Larger Image

 

FortCloser view at the sign of "Fort Victoria".

Larger Image

 

ZeichenThe sign of the "Royal Canadian Engineers".

Larger Image

 

towers This point of view was very popular. The antenna-tower itself was located about 90 meters behind "St. Mathews".

Larger Image

 

CAEThe stationbuilding in late summer of 1970.

Larger Image

 

Tape RecorderWith this machine (Telefunken M 5) the news on shortwave from Canada were recorded for further purposes.

Larger Image
 

BarclaytopBarclay McMillan, born in 1933 in Ulster (Ireland), was the last manager of Radio CAE. He took over the station from his predecessor Hans Konow in 1967. Before he had lead a little station of the CBC's "Northern Services" in Inuvik, N.W.T. After the end of CAE he worked as a program-director for the French service at CFN Lahr. He also spoke German very well, like in that little commentary about the CAE-team.

Larger Image
 

LouieLudwig "Louie" Ruhs 1970 in the controlroom during "Pops On Parade".

Larger Image

 

WesWes Barnaby announcing "Best of the West" . He too worked on the hockey-broadcasts, as the play-to-play announcer. After closedown of CAE he went down to CFN Lahr.

Larger Image

 

 

MalMal Jones was an announcer from 1969 til the end of Radio CAE. Especially popular was his show "Pops On Parade", where he played from 5.45 to 6.30 P.M. daily the actual hits and other well known music. Together with John Hanlon, the last program director of CAE, he also presented the last four hours of broadcasting, their start  can be heard at sounds.

Larger Image

 

RichardAnnouncer Richard Cousson from the French service.

Larger Image

 

SymbolThe CAE-symbol on the microphone in studio A. About the remaining of that micro or the logo nothing could be found out so far.

Larger Image

 

Studio AView from studio A during the show "Coffee-Break" to the controlroom, to the left: Richard Cousson.

Larger Image

 

Studio A View from the controlroom into studio A during "Coffee Break" with "Texas Heinz" behind the controls. The technicians served the mixer, turntables and tape-recorders during broadcasting, but were also responsible for everything else "electric", which sometimes meant extended duty. Transmitter maintenance e.g. could only be done at night during the broadcast-breaks between 1.oo and 6.oo A.M. "Texas Heinz" reports, he always hosted a box with spare transmitter-tubes in the corner…

Larger Image

 

Coffee BreakThe morning-show "Coffee Break", hosted by Karen Lee and Richard Cousson.

Larger Image

 

GateA member of the CAE-staff arrives on duty at the gate.

Larger Image

 

Gate After check-in the gate is closed again for unauthorized personnel.

Larger Image
 

top